Can You Help?

tca trophy cropped2FROM TCA MEMBER BARBARA GARDNER-BRAY:

This is a photograph of a silver-plated trophy that was discovered in an antique shop in Lombardy, Ontario by a good friend of TCA member Barbara Gardner-Bray. Barbara immediately purchased the trophy as an artifact for the Toronto Cornish Association. The JOHN A. TORY TROPHY was presented to the Toronto Cornish Association July 27, 1929.

The trophy was awarded 3 years running (1929, 1930, 1931) to Mr. Horace Roberts for winning the 220 yard dash.

Some preliminary research has uncovered the identity of both the man for whom the trophy was named, and the man who won these races. John A. Tory was the Great Grandfather of John H. Tory, former leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Pary. Horace Roberts was born in Toronto January 17, 1910 and died at Westport, Ontario on October 11, 1983. He was a graduate (B.Arch) of the University of Toronto 1933, and started his practice in Westport in the early 1940’s. He designed numerous schools in this area, as well as an addition to the Brockville Public Library, George St. and an addition to the Brockville Arts Centre, King St. West.

Horace Roberts’ father, Tom Roberts, was from Grogley Halt near Bodmin Moor and Wadebridge. The family home was called Grogley. This information was received from Horace Roberts’ nephew.

Questions arise. Why did John A.Tory put his name to this trophy? What events were held where such a trophy would be awarded to a “runner”? Previous research by Barbara Gardner-Bray has uncovered information on a previous Toronto Cornish Association, one with a large membership which held annual picnics that most likely included such races.

Does anyone have any information about this trophy and the circumstances that surround it? Did any of you ever attend such events put on by the Toronto Cornish Association? Would you know why this trophy was named in John A. Tory’s honour?

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Barbara using our torontocornish@gmail.com address.

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landerringers1landerringers2
FROM TCA MEMBER JACK LANDER:

These are two photographs of the St. Austell Church bell ringers’ outing in 1946 and 1947. In the first photograph, the priest (7th from the left, bottom row) is Canon Gilbert. TCA member Jack Lander is 4th from the left, and his father, Sedgley Lander is 9th from the left. In the second photo, Sedgley Lander is 4th from the right (standing). Do you recognize anyone else in these photographs? Do you have any stories to share about the bell ringers? Are you related to anyone in the photos?

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Jack using the “Contact Us” link below.

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cyh-diane-buckell-port-isaac-schoolFROM TCA MEMBER DIANE BUCKELL:

This is Port Isaac School: Class 2, 1921. The boy in the suit on the right of the sign is my Father, Percival John King. Can anyone name anyone else here or add anything to the story?

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Diane using our torontocornish@gmail.com address.

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ann-ch-falmouthchoirFROM TCA MEMBER ANN CRICHTON-HARRIS:

Canon Brian Christopherson was Rector of Falmouth parish from 1882-1912. He sits surrounded by four colleagues, [were they all curates? One looks rather old to be a curate] and the choir. One former choirboy, R.T. Stroud, wrote to me about 25 years ago. I’m not sure which he is in the photo. “Canon Christopherson …was held in high esteem in Falmouth, in those days the three top men were the Mayor, the Rector and the Police Super…as choir Boys he (the Rector) kept us under strict control, I was aged 12 – 15 years and had great respect for our elders. ” The building, then The Rectory, in Wood Lane is now a Mens’ Club. Can anyone name anyone else here or add anything to the story?

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Ann using our torontocornish@gmail.com address.

 

FROM TCA MEMBER ANN CRICHTON-HARRIS:

My grandfather’s sister, Agnes Harris, b. 1866, was one of those women left single and without a chance for marriage after the First World War.  She and her younger sister stayed home looking after her parents, Dr. and Mrs. A.B. Harris of  Falmouth.  The 1911 Census says Agnes was Secretary for the Guild of Help.   Does anyone know anything about this institution?  I imagine it was Falmouth based.

My Grannie, Eva  R. Christopherson, (later Harris) was born in 1876 in Newcastle. The family moved to Falmouth where she lived with her parents in the Rectory at Falmouth until she was 28.  That year, 1904, she sailed for India and married Dr. E.T. Harris that same year.  One way she had filled her time in Cornwall was doing wood carving. She carved decorative panels which were later used in furniture on cupboard doors and on the back of a settle.  I have this settle.  We called it The Monk’s Bench, and it is now in our dining room.

Was wood carving a popular occupation for women in Falmouth?  It seems unusual. Does anyone know anything about this?

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Ann using our torontocornish@gmail.com address.

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annch-marblebust-250wFROM TCA MEMBER ANN CRICHTON-HARRIS:

My photo is of a bust of my great grandfather, Canon Brian Christopherson, 1837-1916. A Lancashire man but one who lived and worked in Falmouth for over thirty years as Rector of King Charles The Martyr Church. He was also honorary Canon of Truro cathedral amongst other things. This photo was taken in Falmouth. But where IS the bust? Sitting in someone’s garage or at the back of some antique shop? I don’t need to own it, but I would like to know who has it and to be sure whoever owns it now knows who it is and some of the history.

DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION TO SHARE?
Please email Ann using our torontocornish@gmail.com address.